Search
Close this search box.
Search
Close this search box.

MM Workspace

Testimonials from Guiding Eyes Staff

Guide Dog Training

Jolene, GDMI, kneels and holds up her hand to signal a command to yellow Lab 10.

Our Guide Dog Mobility Instructors are tops in their field! The expertise of our guide dog mobility instructors and training staff encourages confidence and courage in those who are blind or have vision loss and seek our services. We continue to explore new methods to create and strengthen a special partnership between a student and their guide dog, with the goal of a creating a successful team. 

Canine Development

In the Puppy Pavilion behind temporary gating a staffperson squats next to yellow puppy as two other puppies play on a steps and ramp platform

Nurturing every aspect of a pup’s journey are the first steps toward producing a successful guide dog team. Cultivating a strong human-animal bond is vital, beginning with early socialization and continuing through guide dog training. This connection serves as the foundation for learning the necessary skills to become an exceptional partner to individuals who have vision loss.

 

 

Client Experience

Margot and black Lab guide dog Jennifer walking down a wide sidewalk

The first point of contact for many students, the Client Experience and Admissions teams do so much more than providing support to those who seek information about obtaining a guide dog. From the application process, to time in class, to celebrating graduation, and navigating retirement, they are an ally to our community of graduates. Returning grads applying for their next guide dog are greeted like old friends. 

Administrative

Kathleen O'Reilly, Planned Giving, with yellow Lab guide dog in harness stands near nature path gazebo smiling in long black dress

Many people play important roles behind the scenes, all working towards one ultimate goal: to provide guide dogs free of charge to those in need. The reputation of Guiding Eyes’ professional staff and programs has lead thousands of blind and visually impaired men and women to seek our services. Whether serving as a liaison between the organization and its stakeholders, seeking funding, promoting the mission, or maintaining operations and facilities, our dedicated staff understands that their roles greatly impact the overall mission.

Veterinary Services

Dr B with hands on neck of a yellow brood who stands on a exam table as they are nose to nose

We offer top-notch veterinary care for our exceptional dogs and puppies at our full-service Veterinary Hospitals. Guiding Eyes’ veterinarians, vet techs and support staff are a supportive team dedicated to ensuring that every four-legged friend receives the best possible care. Their optimal health is maintained from breeding through retirement and all stages in between.  All necessary resources  ensure each dog receives the care and follow-up it deserves.   

Kennel Positions

Our Whelping, Breeding and Training School Kennel staff are committed to providing a healthy and safe environment for our dogs of all ages, from broods and their newborns to guide dogs in training. As a Kennel Technician, responsibilities include performing daily kennel cleaning and maintenance according to set guidelines, ensuring high-quality care for all dogs, and participating in canine enrichment programs. Those interested in joining our kennel staff should be eager to learn, physically active, and enjoy working as part of a team.

Genetics & Breeding

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. 

xxxx

Dr B with hands on neck of a yellow brood who stands on a exam table as they are nose to nose

Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip e

xxx

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Save for future reference

title

Anita sits in a chair in front of a bright pink azalea bush with yellow Lab Loki and both have very happy faces

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

title

Anita sits in a chair in front of a bright pink azalea bush with yellow Lab Loki and both have very happy faces

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

title

Anita sits in a chair in front of a bright pink azalea bush with yellow Lab Loki and both have very happy faces

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

We always provide our dogs free of charge to people who can benefit from their partnership. This includes training, transportation to and from the school, room and board during the training program, and a lifetime of follow-up services.

Under current conditions, it takes up to three years and can cost up to $50,000 annually to breed, raise, and train a dog for a person who is blind. The vast majority of Guiding Eyes for the Blind’s funding comes from the voluntary contributions of friends and supporters, who value the work we do to support blind men and women across the country and around the world. We work hard to put every charitable donation we receive to work directly for the students we serve.

Contrary to common belief, guide dogs do not know how to read and understand traffic signals. A person who is blind or visually impaired determines when it is safe to cross the street by listening to the sounds of parallel traffic. When the handler decides that it is safe to cross, he or she will give the dog the command, “forward,” in order to move out into the street.

The dogs are taught “intelligent disobedience,” and if there is an obstruction in the street or an oncoming vehicle that poses a danger, the dog will choose not to listen to the “forward” command. The dog is able to keep the handler safe even if the handler makes an error or if a driver runs a red light.

Why don’t guide dog schools use rescue dogs?
It takes a very specific dog to be successful as a guide. A guide must be confident in all environments and situations, have the ability to problem-solve and make decisions on his own, have a low distraction level, have impeccable house and social manners, and be able to remain settled for several hours at a time when needed.

A long history of genetic research has shown us that we have a greater chance at producing guide dogs if we breed specifically for temperament and health scores.

We remain devoted to all of our dogs throughout their lifetimes; no Guiding Eyes dog will ever add to the shelter population.

It takes a very specific dog to be successful as a guide. A guide must be confident in all environments and situations, have the ability to problem-solve and make decisions on his own, have a low distraction level, have impeccable house and social manners, and be able to remain settled for several hours at a time when needed.

A long history of genetic research has shown us that we have a greater chance at producing guide dogs if we breed specifically for temperament and health scores.

We remain devoted to all of our dogs throughout their lifetimes; no Guiding Eyes dog will ever add to the shelter population.

Please don’t.

A guide dog is responsible for keeping its handler safe while out in the world, and it is very important not to break the dog’s focus. For a handler who is blind or visually impaired, distracting his or her guide dog is the equivalent of the passenger of a car grabbing the wheel out of a driver’s hand. Never pet a working guide dog.